Health

Breaking Down the 2020 Debates: Health Care

Posted on Sep 11, 2019 in Health, Planning, Retirement, Taxes

Whatever you might think about politics and politicians, decisions made in your state house, the White House and houses of Congress have an impact on you and your personal finances.

I’m writing this mini-series to break down the issues that come up during the Presidential debates in the months leading up to the 2020 elections. When candidates use buzzwords and scare tactics to win at the polls, we lose the real exchange about how we want our lives to look. You need to understand how a tax proposal, health care plan or student loan forgiveness could affect you.

Upfront I want to say that I offer this with no political agenda. My goal is to take the politics out of policy and try to outline what you need to consider in evaluating a proposal or a politician’s platform. What matters to me are the problems we all face, and solutions to them.

So with that in mind, let’s talk about health care. This a long post, so sit back, get a second cup of coffee (or something stronger), and let’s dive in.

WHAT IS HEALTH CARE?
Let’s start by separating the three components of this subject:
1. Health care insurance
2. Health care services
3. Health – your physical and mental well being

All three components have been touched on during the debates, but it’s the first part – insurance – that is the main focus at this point. Employer plans, the Affordable Care Act, “Obamacare” – this is what the “health care debate” has come to mean. That is: How do we pay for help to maintain, enhance and recover our health over the course of our lives?

We’ll start with an overview of the health care insurance system we have, a little history about how we got here, and the various proposals up for debate.

WHAT WE WANT
Here’s what I think most of us want when we think about health care:

• We want to live long, healthy lives.
• We want to prevent illness and understand that preventative care, check-ups and routine testing, can catch big health issues early and help us avoid them.
• We want quality medical care for accidental injury or the Big Issues we haven’t been able to avoid that treats us without bankrupting us.

WHAT WE HAVE
Our system is almost completely backward. Kristen Gillibrand, Tulsi Gabbard, and Marianne Williamson are all correct that we have a “sick care” system that emphasizes treating illness and not a health care system geared towards preventing it.  We see this in data like that from the OECD which shows that the U.S. has a much higher rate of hospital admissions for preventable diseases than in comparable countries.

In the U.S. we have FOUR health care systems:
• Government-paid / government-provided (the Veterans’ Administration (VA) system)
• Government paid / privately provided (Medicare)
• Privately paid / privately provided (Employer plans)
• Self-pay (the individual covers all costs)

Most countries incorporate everything into one system. Our patchwork arrangement was stitched together over time, during various presidential administrations and political regimes. The VA system was in place when Truman (1945-1953) introduced a proposal that 15 years later would become Medicare. When Eisenhower was president (1953-1961), only 9% of single elderly and 14% of elderly couples had insurance coverage for medical expenses.

Before Medicare, less than 15% of older Americans had insurance coverage for medical expenses

Eisenhower signed into law the bill that gave employers a tax exemption for workplace health insurance plans. The insurance industry does not want to deal with selling and administering plans to individuals, and the lobby behind keeping employer plans and their tax exemption is huge. Kennedy (1961-1963) introduced Medicare but it didn’t pass. It was under Johnson (1963-1969) in 1965 that Congress enacted Medicare under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide health insurance to people age 65 and older, regardless of income or medical history.

Friend, colleague and adviser/physician Carolyn McClanahan notes that the concern at the time was coverage over cost; if the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) were to review the program today, it would not be found to be cost effective. Note also that there was no requirement that Medicare recipients pay into the system. The next time you cringe about “socialist” programs, consider that our wildly popular health insurance system for older Americans could be labeled this way. Put the labels aside and consider a program or proposal’s costs and benefits.

Sidebar: Interestingly, it was former President Truman and his wife former First Lady Bess Truman who were the first two recipients of Medicare

So here we are, 50 years after Medicare, and we are still battling two conflicted camps:
Coverage over cost (universal coverage) and Cost over coverage (lowest cost). The Democrats tend to fall into the first camp, Republicans into the second, and the emphasis in the second camp is not the total cost of the program, but the cost to the government.

What you should ask: When politicos are throwing around concerns
about the “cost” of care, ask “The cost to whom?” What we need to be concerned about is total cost to you in premiums, deductibles, out-of-pocket costs and taxes.

The first camp led us to the Affordable Care Act (the ACA, aka Obamacare) and the second is dismantling it in favor of a free market approach. So what does “Medicare For All” offer us?

WHAT IS “MEDICARE FOR ALL”?
If you are confused about what they’re talking about when they say “Medicare for All,” it’s with good reason. There are TEN VERSIONS of health care insurance reform that fall into four broad categories:

Single-Payer (“Medicare-for-All”):
1. Jayapal (D-WA) and
2. Sanders (D-VT) – Single-payer programs covering all US residents, plus long-term care coverage, replaces all private health insurance by extending Medicare.
Public Program with Opt-Out (“Medicare-for-All-Who-Want-It”):
3. DeLauro (D-CT) & Schakowky (D-IL) – Makes Medicare a private option; individuals are auto-enrolled in Medicare for America, a new national health insurance pro-gram, but can opt-out in a year when they have other qualified coverage; employers can continue to offer group plan coverage or pay 8% of payroll for employee cover-age in Medicare for America; Medicare Advantage plans are retained.
Public Plan Options:
4. Cardin (D-MD) – Extends ACA, giving individuals the option to buy a federal public plan (i.e. Medicare); private and public coverages are retained
5. Bennet (D-CO)/Kaine (D-VA)/Delgado (D-NY) – Similar to #4
6. Schakowsky/Whitehouse (D-RI) – Similar to #4
7. Merkley (D-OR)/Richmond (D-LA) – Similar to #4 with employers able to offer a federal public plan
Medicare Buy-In:
8. Stabenow (D-MI) – Individuals can buy into Medicare at age 55; Medicare Advantage plans retained
9. Higgins (R-LA) – Similar to #8
MedicAID Buy-In:
10. Schatz (D-HI) /Rep. Lujan (D-NM) – States can offer a public plan option based on Medicaid

The Kaiser Family Foundation has created a side-by-side comparison of the competing proposals (current as of May 2019) with a futher breakdown of the details: Get KFF’s Side-by-Side Comparison

From a personal finance perspective, you care most about (1) what is a plan going to cost you, and (2) what benefits do you get with it. From a public policy perspective, we have to think about program costs, and cost containment.

WHO PAYS?
The short answer is, we all do. Directly and indirectly. A lot of people stop listening to the debate out of fear that their health care costs will increase or they will lose benefits with any kind of change. You need to think comprehensively about all the ways you pay for health care coverage, and whether you might get better or more comprehensive coverage under a new proposal.

It’s likely you are paying more for the coverage you have today than you did even a year or two ago. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, in 2018 the average annual premium for employer-based family coverage rose 5% to $19,616 for by 3% for single coverage, to $6,896. Single employees carried 18% of their premium cost and workers with family coverage carried 29% of their cost, on average.

And it costs all of us by skipping preventative care and developing chronic disease.

How it Works Now
Under our current crazy quilt of coverage, if you’re over 65 and covered by Medicare, you still have premiums to pay; if your income in retirement is above certain thresholds, you’re paying a Medicare surcharge on top of that.

If you’re working, you’ll pay 1.45% of your gross wages with no income limit to Medicare as part of your payroll taxes. (Wages include things like RSU vests – you’ll pay $1,450 to Medicare on a $100,000 vest.) If you make over $200,000 (or $250,000 as a married person), you’ll pay an additional tax of 0.9% on earned income over those thresholds to Medicare, and another 3.8% on net investment income over thresholds.

In addition to your 1.45%, your employer is kicking in another 1.45%. If you’re self-employed, you’re paying the full 2.9% (and possibly + 0.9% + 3.8% over the above-noted thresholds). In case that’s hard to follow, you can find more detail on how these taxes work here.

If you’re working, you may have health care coverage through your employer – though 40% of workers do not. Even with an employer plan, you’ll still pay a portion of the cost for that, and your share has been growing as the costs of health care grow. If you’re self-employed, you’re paying into Medicare and covering your own health care insurance costs at market rates.

On top of your premiums and expenses up to your deductible, a portion of your federal taxes beyond payroll taxes goes to Medicare, and you have out-of-pocket costs for things your plan doesn’t cover as well.

Other Costs
The other ways we pay are through choices we can’t make without losing health care coverage:
• if you want to retire early (before age 65), you’ll have to factor in how to cover health care insurance costs before Medicare kicks in;
• if you lose your job, you’ll be paying the full costs of your insurance coverage (COBRA allows you to continue coverage, but not at the rate your former employer subsidized – you’re paying the full cost);
• if you want to leave your job to start a business, you’ll be doing the same, covering the full cost of your insurance as well as the cash burn of your business;
• if you’ve been covered on a spouse’s plan and want to leave a marriage when you don’t have a job that provides health insurance, you’ll have to find a way to pay for your health insurance.

Or you go without coverage, and we are right back to the problem of avoiding preventative care and facing potentially bigger problems down the road, a burden we all bear. All of these costs stifle the free movement of people and business and innovation.

THE HURDLES OF REFORM
A lot of the discussion about these new proposals centers around cost. And it should: our current system is not only not effective, it’s not sustainable. All the costs you have that are noted above are still not covering the cost of care. Medicare premiums and payroll taxes only cover about half the cost of the program. The balance of what’s needed comes out of the federal budget, and each year the share of your taxes going to pay for Medicare increases. In 2018, Medicare cost $582 billion, accounting for 14% of the federal budget and making it the second largest federal program.  And Medicare does not cover vision, dental, or long-term care.

A major scare tactic in the health care debate is that the new plans will cost you more. During the second presidential debate in July, Elizabeth Warren got it exactly right when she refused to be pushed into saying taxes would rise under a Medicare-for-All plan just in order to get a sound bite for the nightly news. Whether you would pay more in taxes is a red herring. That’s not the only cost you have. What you care about is your total cost for health care coverage.

If I am paying $10,000/year for health insurance with a $6,500 deductible, and someone says I could reduce my premiums to $8,000/year and lower my deductible to $5,000 if I pay $1,500 more in tax, my total annual cost for health care falls by $2,000 (and by even more if my expenses exceed $5,000), for an additional $1,500 in taxes. That $500 net savings is real money to me. Sign me up.

What you should ask: When fear-mongers are raising the issue of higher taxes from insurance reform, ask “What is the TOTAL COST to me?” You pay premiums, deductibles, taxes and co-pays; you need to be concerned about the total cost to you.

Not taking into account total health care expenses is often a costly mistake in retirement planning. According to Fidelity’s Annual Retiree Health Care Cost Estimate, a 65-year old couple retiring in 2019 can expect to spend $285,000 in health care and medical expenses throughout retirement, compared with $280,000 in 2018. For single retirees, the health care cost estimate is $150,000 for women and $135,000 for men.

Some of the proposals would result in substantially greater federal tax revenue, but not from you. Plans that remove the burden of health care coverage from employers also remove the tax deduction Eisenhower gave them for that expense. What happens when you lose a tax deduction? You pay more in taxes. Without the cost of having to provide an employer plan, businesses will pay more in taxes. McClanahan calculated the additional tax revenue to be $250 billion per year.

There are also protectionist obstacles to changing our system. With plenty of profit being made by insurers and fee-for-service specialty care providers, those factions and their lobbyists will do their best to maintain the status quo.

Changes in insurance plans isn’t a complete solution, though. The way we deliver health care in the U.S. has to change, too. We spend $3.2 trillion annually on health care in the U.S and 25% to 30% of that is overhead, while overhead in other countries runs 5-15%. By McClanahan’s calculations, we could provide primary care to all just by reducing overhead to 15%.

What you should ask: When you hear that “we can’t afford” a particular proposal, ask “Since the cost of our existing health care system is unsustainable, what is your proposal to reduce overhead costs?”

REAL REFORM
We started this discussion with the two primary concerns of the cost of care and the benefits you can receive. So far we’ve discussed is insurance coverage for individuals and families; none of this addresses the cost of the health care system, meaning the medical professionals, clinics and hospitals that deliver care, and the range of benefits for which you may be eligible under different plans.

Fixing our health care system mean changes not only in insurance options, but in the administration and delivery of medical care. Watch for who mentions these as the debate continues:
• Moving from four systems to ONE (like Canada);
• Using a single billing system (like France);
• Removing primary care from insurance, providing it as a public service (through Community Health Centers (like Spain);
• Developing a nationalized electronic database for our individual medical information, removing it as an asset that belongs to a specific insurer or hospital network, and shifting its focus from billing to patient history (like the VA ”blue button” system here in the U.S.).

These are all big ideas, but they are not new ideas. Preventative care is not an insurable event, it is something each of us needs and makes more sense to be offered outside of an insurance program. A hybrid system that combines a public-provided “primary care for all” for preventative medicine with public and private options for everything else would give us a couple of things:

All Americans would have the preventative care needed to stay as healthy as possible
We preserve choice for health care beyond basic preventative medicine by offering both public and private options for specialists and care that requires hospitalization
Competition can drive down costs further by having a not-for-profit provider like a public option in the mix to force down costs of for-profit organizations.

It’s hard not to get swept up in the histrionics that make up political debate. Getting to the root of a proposal or plan, and understanding how it might affect you, is the only way to really protect your interests. When the candidates turn to health care, you’re now knowledgeable about the 10 flavors of “Medicare-for-All,” savvy enough to ask about whether they mean single payer, a public option, or a buy-in, and sharp enough to look past labels to the actual plans, to evaluate what they might mean for you.

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Planning for Joy

Posted on Jan 7, 2019 in Community, Health, Simplicity

Yes, losing 10 pounds might bring you joy when it happens. Giving up red meat and quitting smoking will help improve your health over time. Saving more money will result in meeting financial goals sooner, or with greater confidence, and you know I’m going to encourage this, but it won’t happen overnight.

I cannot object to any of these resolutions. They are all laudable. They also require change, and change is hard. It takes at least three weeks to change a habit, and often longer. By all means, get started on those resolutions (or re-start them), but also plan for greater joy.

In addition to my New Year’s Resolutions, here’s what I’m planning to add more joy to my life:

1. Play
My dog has a good life. On her worse days, she suffers from the boredom of watching me work. Since I have to work to keep a doghouse over her head, she’s going to have to learn to deal with it. And yet, that doesn’t mean I can’t learn a thing or two from her, too.

Often when I’m downstairs in the office, she is upstairs in her corner perch, watching the neighborhood scene. I’ll hear her pad down the stairs and come around the corner into the office. Every time she does this, I greet her with my happiest dog-voice, and take a break in what I’m doing for a pet and a little play. I say I do this for her, to have good associations with my office so she’ll hang out here. In truth, I find it is good for me, as well. I am terrible at taking breaks, and the dog is a natural.

I could just set a timer and tell myself to take a break. How much more fun it is, though, to unleash the joy of seeing my dog prance around the office with her little paws in the air, her play-bow, and her goofy look, when I take a breath before I start a new project.

2. Organize My Desk
I know this sounds like work. I am a planner by nature, and I like order in my universe. Maybe it’s a coping mechanism, but it also helps me to focus and relax into whatever I’m doing when I’m in a clutter-free zone. My new house is slowly getting organized, but not yet up to my standards of order, and it’s stressing me out. As a business owner, there is no end to things to do for the job. A clear desk is an accomplishment, too. My plan for the New Year at work is to close out each day putting my desk in order, filing papers, and scheduling the next day.

Earlier in the business I sublet office space from a large engineering firm. The sliding glass doors to each office had no locks. For practical purposes, I ended each work day putting all my projects away, under lock and key. Starting the next day was bliss! Taking joy in sitting down and intentionally beginning a new project, rather than staring down a pile of ongoing work, is my goal for 2019. I’ve done it before, and I know I can do it again!

If you’re inclined to try a bit of rearranging to de-clutter your space but need a little nudge, here are a couple of resources. I was a huge fan of Peter Walsh and his Clean Sweep program on HGTV. The program is 10 years old, but his approach is timeless. His philosophy towards organizing your home and office is the same as mine towards personal finance: arrange your environment (or money) to live a richer, fuller life with less stress. And you can sign up for his #31DaysToGetOrganized daily reminders to help you one day at a time. If Marie Kondo’s Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up is more your speed, you can read her book or go straight to her new series on Netflix to learn how to “KonMari” your spaces.

Kondo talks specifically about joy in organizing your things, and Walsh used his master’s degree in educational psychology to help people let go of the associations they have with things that no longer serve them and to refocus on what really mattered. Both focus special attention on items of sentimental value, and the meaning they add to our lives. Here’s to more joy and greater meaning in your spaces (and at my desk) in 2019!

For more on Peter Walsh: Peter Walsh on YouTube
For Marie Kondo on Netflix: Marie Kondo on Netflix

3. Re-invigorate My Hibernation
Even though we are past the Solstice and our days are getting longer, Winter has barely begun and we will have many cold, gloomy days to come. “Hiberation” is from the Latin meaning “to pass the winter” and for many that means hunkering down and doing as little as possible until the warmth and sun call us out into the world again. But therein lies a missed opportunity.

For nine years after my mother’s stroke, I split my weekends into two periods: Saturdays were for life maintenance, running errands, stocking the fridge, doing laundry. Getting the house in order for a new week. Sundays were spent with my mom. Doing her laundry, checking on supplies for her apartment, getting her place in order for the next week, watching a movie or going to a show, and having dinner before going home. I loved the time with my mom, but I was exhausted by the end of the weekend. After she died, I had a hard time figuring out my Sundays. Then one Sunday I had brunch with friends. I remembered the luxury of sleeping in, meeting for eggs and biscuits, and lingering over that final cup of coffee.

Lately I’d been feeling blue again on Sundays. The luxury of a “free” day seemed to be amplifying the freedom single people have: I could do anything. And so sometimes I did nothing, only to feel let down by frittering away my time. I started to plan outings for my Sunday afternoons. A movie, a play, a museum. All the things I loved, things easy to do on my own, and things that would get me out of my own head and return me home refreshed. That was a successful Sunday, a joy.

Winter weekends can be perfect for binge-worthy TV on a comfy sofa with a warm beverage and snacks. They can also be opportunities to explore your neighborhood or city, enjoy a hobby or expand your connection to others. And even if you’ve fallen off the resolution wagon already, get right back on, and as you work on changes for an Improved You, consider a few tweaks for a more joyful You as well.

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Tax ALERT – What to Know For Year-End Planning

Posted on Dec 24, 2017 in Divorce, Health, Taxes

As holiday lights twinkle around me and passersby bundle up against the cold, Congress was hard at work pushing their tax reform bill through the legislature. Their stated goal was to simplify the tax system, stimulate the economy and create jobs.

There’s no simplification here, and economic stimulus is dubious, but there are a few things you need to know now if you want to do some 11th hour planning, especially if you have been itemizing your deductions:

Mortgage interest – Interest on mortgages taken out on 12/15/17 or later is deductible only up to $750,000, down from the current $1,000,000 of mortgage debt
Second Homes – This mortgage interest deduction is available for a personal residence and one other home
Home equity loans – The deduction for home equity loans and lines of credit is repealed; interest on up to $100,000 of this debt was deductible
State and Local Taxes (SALT) – Deductions for these taxes (including sales taxes in states with no income tax) combined with property taxes are capped at $10,000
PLANNING NOTE: You can pre-pay property taxes in jurisdictions where this is allowed. You can check here to see if you can accelerate a property tax payment in King County, WA and the San Francisco Bay Area:
King County, WA: https://www.seattletimes.com/business/real-estate/king-county-dont-prepay-your-property-taxes-now-to-avoid-tax-hit-next-year/

SF Bay Area:  http://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Faced-with-loss-of-deduction-more-Bay-Area-12448244.php
You expressly cannot prepay 2018 state and local income tax.
Medical Expenses – The threshold for this deduction is 7.5% retroactive to 2017 through 2019 – then it goes back to 10%.
Charitable Contributions – You now need substantiation for ALL charitable contributions, but the limit on what you can deduct has been increased from 50% of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) to 60%.
Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions – These deductions are currently subject to a 2%-of-AGI threshold, but are eliminated entirely after 2017:

  • Moving expenses (except for the Armed Forces)
  • Moving expense exclusion (for expenses paid by employer)
  • Unreimbursed employer expenses (you file a Form 2106 for these)
  • Qualified bicycle commuting ($20/month)
  • Personal casualty losses (EXCEPT if in a disaster zone)
  • Safe deposit box fees
  • Tax preparer fees
  • Investment advisory expenses
    PLANNING NOTE: You may want to ask your tax preparer if you would benefit from paying their fee before 12/31/17, while you can still take a deduction for it. Likewise, for your investment advisor. Here is a quick chart to give you an idea of the total of these miscellaneous expenses you must have before even have a deduction:

AGI = $50,000, 2% = $1,000

AGI = $100,000, 2% = $2,000

AGI = $250,000, 2% = $5,000

AGI = $400,000, 2% = $8,000

Note: Any of you with AGI over $313,800 (Married Filing Jointly) / $261,500 (Single) will start to see your Itemized Deductions also reduced by the Pease limitation.

Alimony – Marital support paid to an ex-spouse has been deductible by the payee and includible on the return of the recipient. For new divorce settlements, alimony is no longer deductible after 2018. Note: this change is a revenue raiser: Almost always the person paying alimony is in higher bracket than the recipient.

Obamacare – Despite what the President has stated about repeal, technically the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka “Obamacare”) is still on the books, as is the individual mandate. The individual mandate has NOT been repealed, but penalty for not having coverage equals 0% after 2017

In my view, the Trump Tax Plan is bad, though not as bad as it could have been based on earlier proposals. Some workers may see a little relief for a couple of years, but the big wins go to public companies and the wealthiest Americans.

It is also unlikely the President will sign the bill into law before the end of the year. By waiting to sign until 2018, cuts to Medicare and Social Security that are part of this package won’t impact voters until after the 2018 mid-term elections.

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Three Easy Resolutions for 2016

Posted on Jan 3, 2016 in Health, Planning, Relationship

I love making resolutions. I make them at New Year’s, at mid-year, and in the Fall when we’re headed into the end of the year.  Even if you’re not the type to make resolutions, here are three I hope you’ll consider:

  1. Move – Whether you hit the gym, run in the neighborhood, walk in the park or dance around the house, it doesn’t matter. What does matter is that you move. You can sit on your backside for 23-1/2 hours a day, but for at least 30 minutes, get up and shake up your system. In addition to helping any “lose 10 pounds” resolution you may have, this one also helps your other bottom line:  one of the big contributors to disability is stress, and one of the biggest unexpected costs in retirement is medical expenses.  Exercise improves your health (and its associated costs) in many ways, and boosts your mood.
  2. Love – It takes 20 seconds for a hug to change your body chemistry for the better. According to the University of North Carolina study, after 20 seconds you get the oxytocin release that reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and supports the bond you have with that person. If you’re looking to build meaningful relationships, one easy way to do that is to hug a little longer. Your longer hugs can benefit your heart and blood pressure, too.
  3. Save – You might guess this resolution would be on my list, but it’s not what you think. Often we’re pulled in multiple directions by the different threads of our lives, and at the end of the day we can end up feeling, well, frayed. This year, make a resolution to save a part of your day or week just for you. It won’t make you a bad parent, a weak employee, or a selfish spouse. It may just help you do all those other things better. We each need something that’s just ours. A mediation practice, learning a musical instrument, cultivating a sport. It might seem frivolous, but those 15 or 30 minutes of focus on this thing that’s yours can take you out of whatever the rest of life may be throwing at you, and give you not only a break, but also something you can never lose.

These three goals can leave you with amped endorphins, oxytocin, and joy. And who knows what other resolutions you could tackle after these? Imagine what your life could be like – working towards all those other goals we all set – with an energetic, relaxed, and joyful countenance?  If your financial planning goals are intended to ultimately lead you to a happy and fulfilled life, aren’t you making a good start towards meeting those goals with these three?

Mantras

In the last few years, I’ve also added a “mantra” for the New Year, a phrase or saying that will encourage me in certain ways. The first year I did it, I had realized that I had become way too attached to certain outcomes, a sure path to unhappiness. My mantra that year was “Just Say Yes.”  Yes to the movie the friend suggested, yes to speaking at an event I wasn’t sure about, yes to going with the flow (and “no” to trying to control everything).  Shonda Rhimes, one of my heroes, did a “Just Say Yes” year recently and loved the way it opened up her life so much she took time away from writing her television juggernaut to write a book about it: http://variety.com/2015/tv/news/shonda-rhimes-year-of-yes-tgit-1201632148/)

Like many people, I also have a weight loss goal for the New Year. And I want to push myself professionally by sharing more personally, a sometimes intimidating act. So for 2016, I have two mantras: “I’d rather be slender and sexy” (for when I really want a cheeseburger and a glass of wine) and “Don’t be afraid” (for the many times when my left brain wants to thwart my right brain and stop me from moving forward with a new idea). We all have scripts that run in our heads, and changing them up from time to time can help push you to do something you might not do otherwise.  Think about what your best friend might tell you when you’re stretching to meet a goal, and put that good voice in your head.

So for 2016, in addition to hitting the gym regularly, hugging my friends longer, and taking French lessons to regain my language skills, I’ll also be watching my diet and pushing myself a little further in the office.  I’m betting the first three will help me stick to the last two.

No one ever said resolutions have to be tough. You’re just setting your intention to do something. Walk, hug, cultivate something you love.  It’s your life, you get one shot.  You have 365 days to do your best to make this year the one you want it to be.

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